Receiving stolen property is a potential felony.  Contact Meyer Van Severen, S.C. at (414) 270-0202 to begin your defense

Receiving stolen property is prohibited by section 943.34 of the Wisconsin Statutes.  The crime basically prohibits individuals from receiving or concealing stolen property.  The defendant must have done so knowingly or intentionally.  Whether this crime is a felony or a misdemeanor is determined based on the value of the property involved.

The criminal defense lawyers at Meyer Van Severen, S.C. regularly defend receiving stolen property cases.  The charge commonly accompanies other crimes.  Sometimes, a co-defendant will be charged with receiving stolen property when there’s a broader criminal conspiracy involving a burglary or robbery.  An individual who holds on to the property, even temporarily, is charged with this offense.

Criminal defense attorneys Matt Meyer and Ben Van Severen are prepared to defend your receiving stolen property case.  If you’ve been accused of this crime, contact us today.  (414) 270-0202.


 What is receiving stolen property?

All criminal offenses have elements that need to be proven beyond a reasonable doubt at trial.  The elements of receiving stolen property are:

  1. The defendant intentionally received/concealed the property.
  2. The property was stolen property.
  3. When the property was received/stolen, the defendant knew that it was stolen property.

Intentionally means that the defendant had the mental purpose to receive or conceal the property.  Receive means to acquire possession or control over the property.  Conceal means to hide the property or to do something else which prevents or makes more difficult the discovery of the property.

Property is stolen property when it has intentionally been taken from the owner without consent and with the intent to deprive the owner of its possession permanently.


When is the crime a felony?  A misdemeanor?

  • If the property value is under $2,500.00 it’s a Class A misdemeanor.
  • If the property is worth $2,500.00 – $5,000.00 it’s a Class I felony.
  • If the property involved is worth $5,000.00 – $10,000.00 the crime is a Class H felony.
  • If the property is worth more than $10,000.00, the crime is a Class G felony.

Contact Meyer Van Severen, S.C. regarding your receiving stolen property case.

Criminal defense attorneys Matt Meyer and Ben Van Severen have defended receiving stolen property cases.  We’ve defended these criminal cases at trial.  If you’ve been charged with receiving stolen property, contact defense firm Meyer Van Severen, S.C. at (414) 270-0202 today.