Tag: homicide

Intentionally discharging a firearm from a vehicle defense attorneys – Wis. Stat. 941.20(3)

Section 941.20(3) of the Wisconsin Statutes – Endangering safety by use of a dangerous weapon. Section 941.20(3) of the Wisconsin Statutes describes this crime.  Specifically, it indicates: (a) Whoever intentionally discharges a firearm from a vehicle while on a highway, as defined in s. 340.01 (22), or on a vehicle parking lot that is open to the…

CONTINUE READING

Homicide by intoxicated use of a firearm or airgun defense attorneys – Wis. Stat. 940.09(1g)

What is homicide by intoxicated use of a firearm?  Homicide by intoxicated use of an airgun?  Section 940.09(1g) of the Wisconsin Statutes explains: Section 940.09(1g) of the Wisconsin Statutes defines this homicide charge.  Specifically, the law says: (1g) Any person who does any of the following is guilty of a Class D felony: (a) Causes the death…

CONTINUE READING

Homicide by intoxicated use of a vehicle

What are the elements of homicide by intoxicated use of a vehicle? All criminal offenses in Wisconsin have certain elements that the government must prove beyond a reasonable doubt at trial.  If the government cannot prove each element, the defendant must be found not guilty.  While most elements are pretty simple, we’re going to provide…

CONTINUE READING

Assisting suicide defense attorneys – 940.12

What is assisting suicide? Assisting suicide is helping an individual to take his or her own life.  In recent years, and other jurisdictions, assisting suicide charges have been brought against ex-girlfriends and boyfriends who encouraged their partners to take their lives.  Unfortunately, cases like this can attract media attention and go viral rather quickly. Wis….

CONTINUE READING

Abortion defense attorneys – Wis. Stat. 940.04

Wis. Stat. 940.04 – Abortion Section 940.04 of the Wisconsin Statutes prohibits abortion.  The law says: (1)  Any person, other than the mother, who intentionally destroys the life of an unborn child is guilty of a Class H felony. (2) Any person, other than the mother, who does either of the following is guilty of a Class…

CONTINUE READING

Homicide by negligent handling of a dangerous weapon

What is “homicide by negligent handling of dangerous weapon, explosives, or fire”? Section 940.08 of the Wisconsin Statutes prohibits negligent handling of a dangerous weapon, explosives, or fire.  The law says: (1) Except as provided in sub. (3), whoever causes the death of another human being by the negligent operation or handling of a dangerous…

CONTINUE READING

Homicide by negligent operation of a vehicle

What is homicide by negligent operation of a vehicle? Section 940.10 of the Wisconsin Statutes prohibits homicide by negligent operation of a vehicle.  There are two versions of the offense, but the only difference in the status of the victim.  Section 940.10(1) of the Wisconsin Statutes deals with homicide of another human being.  Section 940.10(2)…

CONTINUE READING

Mutilating or hiding a corpse defense

What is mutilating a corpse? Mutilating a corpse is a crime prohibited by section 940.11(1) of the Wisconsin Statutes.  The exact language of the statute indicates that it’s a crime when an individual “mutilates, disfigures or dismembers a corpse, with intent to conceal a crime or avoid apprehension…”  As with any criminal offense, there are…

CONTINUE READING

Second degree intentional homicide defense

What are mitigating circumstances? Mitigating circumstances reduce a first degree case to a second degree case.  They certainly don’t excuse the underlying criminal conduct.  But the legislature determined that mercy and fairness warrant the reduction in criminal liability.  Mitigating circumstances for a first-degree intentional homicide case include: Adequate provocation.  This focuses on the fact that…

CONTINUE READING

First degree intentional homicide defense

What are mitigating circumstances? Mitigating circumstances are certainly important to consider while defending intentional murder charges.  While they don’t excuse the defendant’s actions, they reduce the offense.  When properly found, the following mitigating circumstances reduce this charge to second degree intentional homicide: Adequate provocation.  The victim’s death was caused under the influence of adequate provocation….

CONTINUE READING
icon-angle icon-bars icon-times