Tag: Property crime

Fraudulent use of a financial transaction card defense – Wis. Stat. 943.41(5)

Fraudulent use of a financial transaction card, explained by the criminal defense attorneys at Van Severen Law Office, S.C. Fraudulent use of a financial transaction card is one of many financial crimes in Wisconsin.  In a simple example, this crime occurs when the defendant steals another individual’s credit card and then uses it to purchase…

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Operating vehicle without owner’s consent defense – Wis. Stat. 943.23

Call Van Severen Law Office to discuss your operating a vehicle without owner’s consent case Operating a vehicle without owner’s consent is a serious charge in Wisconsin.  Sometimes called grand theft auto in other jurisdictions, this charge focuses on stealing a vehicle from someone else.  Prior to May 2023, this statute also included subsections that described…

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Retail theft defense – Wis. Stat. 943.50

Retail theft in Wisconsin quickly becomes a felony.  Contact one of our top criminal defense attorneys immediately: Retail theft is the kind of charge that might sound relatively harmless.  Unfortunately, it isn’t, and if you’re accused of shoplifting from a business, you’ll face a quickly escalating penalty scheme.  Retail theft starts as a Class A…

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Receiving stolen property defense – Wis. Stat. 943.34

Receiving stolen property in Wisconsin is potentially a felony.  Contact Van Severen Law Office, S.C. immediately at (414) 270-0202 for help Receiving stolen property charges in Wisconsin become more serious as the value involved increases.  The charge starts as a Class A misdemeanor (for offenses involving less than $2,500.00) and escalates to a Class G…

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Loan Sharking – Wis. Stat. 943.28

Section 943.28 of the Wisconsin Statutes – Loan Sharking Section 943.28 of the Wisconsin Statutes defines loan sharking.  The statute indicates: (1)  For the purposes of this section: (a) To collect an extension of credit means to induce in any way any person to make repayment thereof. (b) An extortionate extension of credit is any extension of credit…

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Removing a major part of a vehicle without owner’s consent – Wis. Stat. 943.23(5)

What does Section 943.23(5) of the Wisconsin Statutes prohibit? Section 943.23(5) of the Wisconsin Statutes prohibit removing a major part of a vehicle without the owner’s consent.  The law says: (5) Whoever intentionally removes a major part of a vehicle without the consent of the owner is guilty of a Class I felony. Whoever intentionally removes…

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Fraud on a hotel or restaurant keeper – Wis. Stat. 943.21

What does the statute say? Statutes prohibit specific actions, which we call crimes.  Section 943.21 of the Wisconsin Statutes prohibits “fraud on hotel or restaurant keeper, recreational attraction, taxicab operator, or gas station.”  Specifically, the law indicates: (1m) Whoever does any of the following may be penalized as provided in sub. (3): (a) Having obtained any beverage, food,…

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Absconding without paying rent – Wis. Stat. 943.215

What is absconding without paying rent? Section 943.215 of the Wisconsin Statutes defines absconding without paying rent.  The law says: (1)  Whoever having obtained the tenancy, as defined in s. 704.01 (4), of residential property he or she is entitled to occupy, intentionally absconds without paying all current and past rent due is guilty of a Class…

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Criminal trespass to a medical facility – Wis. Stat. 943.145

What is criminal trespass to a medical facility? Section 943.145 of the Wisconsin Statutes defines criminal trespass to a medical facility.  The law indicates: (1) In this section, “medical facility” means a hospital under s. 50.33 (2) or a clinic or office that is used by a physician licensed under ch. 448 and that is subject to rules promulgated by…

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Entry into locked coinbox defense attorneys – 943.125

What is entry into a locked coinbox? Section 943.125 of the Wisconsin Statutes prohibits entry into a locked coinbox.  The law says: (1)  Whoever intentionally enters a locked coin box of another without consent and with intent to steal therefrom is guilty of a Class A misdemeanor. (2) Whoever has in personal possession any device or instrumentality…

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